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In addition to North Dakota’s stunning landscapes and warm hospitality, the state’s tourism attractions are committed to ensuring accessibility for all. Whether you’re a resident or planning a vacation, the beauty of North Dakota both outdoors and within many of the world-class museums is increasingly accessible for everyone.

Here are a few highlights of accessible experiences in North Dakota with accommodations and access for individuals with mobility, sensory, vision and hearing challenges: 

Statewide 

The North Dakota Parks and Recreation Department 

With a commitment to ensuring accessibility for all visitors, North Dakota’s Parks and Recreation Department recently acquired new equipment to bring greater accessibility and inclusivity for all visitors to make for a fun experience. As of September 2023, North Dakota is home to the first park system in the nation to support color accessibility in all of its state parks with EnChroma glasses for color blindness, which enables users to experience the colorful beauty of nature more fully in North Dakota's state parks.  

Additionally, Lake Metigoshe State Park in Bottineau is one of 18 nationwide recipients to receive a free-to-use Action Axis Trackchair to ensure people with mobility challenges can enjoy the park’s natural beauty, recreational activities, and facilities. For those who want to enjoy water activities, many of North Dakota’s state parks are also equipped with adaptive kayak and canoe launches, which provide a safe and accessible way for all visitors to easily enter and exit small watercraft. 

Bismarck 

North Dakota Heritage Center & State Museum 

The North Dakota Heritage Center and State Museum is an educational adventure for visitors of all ages and abilities. From a life-size T. rex skeleton cast to a Mars spacesuit, to exhibits of rare pottery and beadwork, 600 million years of North Dakota can be seen through four galleries with accessible features and interactive displays.  

Fargo 

Plains Art Museum 

Enjoy a family day at Fargo’s Plains Art Museum with their Low-Sensory Mondays and the Art & Autism: Shape + Movement programs. Low-Sensory Mondays are on the first Monday of every month from 2 until 5 p.m. when sensory stimulants are lowered throughout the museum and attendance is limited. The Art & Autism: Shape + Movement effort features a 90-minute program which includes touring the museum and hands-on artwork activities to explore color, shape, writing, drawing, and body movement with the museum education staff.   

Fargo Theatre 

The Fargo Theatre offers cinema support equipment for the hearing and/or visually impaired including specialty headphones and personal receivers designed to make the cinema experience inclusive for all. The headphones can either amplify the existing soundtrack or play a special soundtrack with audio description of the action on screen. The Theatre also offers personal receivers that attach to a patron’s seat and provide closed captioning of a movie’s dialogue and sound effects for those with significant hearing loss. 

Jamestown 

The Arts Center  

Jamestown’s Art Center offers an Art for Life program, pairing the arts center with a local elder care facility to provide intensive art and artist interaction for the care facility’s residents and their families. The North Dakota Council on the Arts (NDCA) drew on the work of Dr. William Thomas to develop the program that provides daily spontaneity and opportunities for growth that help alleviate loneliness, boredom, and helplessness of those residing in elder care centers. Ongoing grants from the NDCA and the National Endowment for the Arts have allowed the Art for Life program to grow from three sites (Jamestown, Langdon and Pekin) to 14 elder care facilities in 11 communities across North Dakota. There is great variety in the program offerings from a broad range of musical endeavors, poetry reading, mural painting and yoga to the creation of ice fishing decoys, ceramic vases, and instruction on kuchen making, weaving and more.  

Medora 

Theodore Roosevelt National Park 

In the colorful canyons of the western North Dakota Badlands, Theodore Roosevelt National Park should be a must on your list. With accessible trails and viewing areas, this park provides visitors with the opportunity to experience the park's breathtaking beauty. Monuments like the Painted Canyon and the Little Missouri River as well as wildlife such as bison, horses, elk, prairie dogs, and other wildlife, are seamless to experience for individuals with mobility challenges. 

Historic Medora 

The Access Medora initiative creates accessible experiences for visitors with mobility and sensory challenges to enjoy the Old West charm of Medora with accessible tours, museums, and entertainment options. Most recently, Access Medora installed a high-capacity elevator at the Burning Hills Amphitheatre that has made the Medora Musical even more accessible for people of all abilities to enjoy captivating performances under the stars. 

Minot 

Scandinavian Heritage Park 

The only outdoor museum in the world that showcases all five Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, is located in the heart of Minot. The park has accessible pathways that wind through delightful gardens and traditional Scandinavian structures, creating an immersive experience for all. With audio tours, service animals, and total wheelchair accessibility, there is something for everyone at the Scandinavian Heritage Park. 

Minot Outdoor Recreation Area 

This beautiful spot is the perfect place to go hiking or biking on five total miles of trails and two miles of accessible paved and gravel trails featuring a scenic view of the prairie landscape and diverse native plants and animals. 

Magic City Discovery Center 

The Magic City Discovery Center has entrances that are universally accessible to wheelchair and strollers. The elevators provide access to all floors and exhibits that have been designed for all abilities. On Friday nights, Magic City offers Sensory-Friendly nights designed for children and their families. Staff at the center have been trained to create a fun, educational, and enjoyable experience for all. 

Washburn 

Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center 

The Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center highlights the journey of Lewis and Clark with accessible exhibits and educational programs. Additionally, the Washburn Discovery Trail has a paved pathway that travels toward the Missouri River and winds along its tree-lined bank, ending at Riverside Park, where you'll find the historical Sioux Ferry. 

For more on Legendary ways to experience North Dakota and the accessibility options, visit NDTourism.com.  

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